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Tom Stuckey
01425 270802

 

Tom Stuckey was President of the British Methodist Conference in 2005. This website has been set up with his wife Christine, to introduce you to our writings and encourage theological reflection both within the Methodist Church and beyond. Take a look and let us know what you think! 

Tom Stuckey     

CLICK PICTURE FOR TOM'S    PROFILE      

   

 

You may remember that I was invited to write some notes on the book of Jonah for the Bible Month magazine. 

That Magazine is now available on:  www.methodist.org.uk/our-faith/the-bible/bible-month/bible-month-magazine

                 Early January 2018

 'SINGING THE LORD'S SONG IN A STRANGE LAND'
 The future of the Church in Britain:  A Methodist Perspective            
            (details here)      
                                    To read a sample
click HERE

                 I have produced a STUDY GUIDE. Run off a copy
HERE

                   
NEW SPECIAL OFFER
 
20 now for THREE copies and this includes postage. I am doing this because some who have purched a copy wish to use the book for study purposes in 'housegroups'.  Contact me soon (a Christmas gift?)

The normal price of the book plus postage is  12
Contact me on  mail1@tomstuckey.me.uk 
 
 
 
The book is also on sale at Westminster Central Hall, The New Room Bristol, Sarum College, Salisbury for 10.
          
 

  

 
       

 

              HERE ARE SOME OF CHRISTINE'S PAPERS
                            (click below)             
                                                                         
           1.  Pilgrimage to Lindisfarne
 
           2.  MWiB District Celebration

           3.  A Pilgrimage at home

           4Pilgrimage poem

 

 

THIS MONTH'S REFLECTION   by Tom

                       TOM'S NEW BOOK

'Grace & Truth' from my book BEYOND THE BOX 

It is 1980. I have arrived in Buttula and will stay in a tiny Christian community in a dangerous Buddhist heartland in the south of Sri Lanka. The civil is raging in the north but violence also lurks below the surface even here.

The sun is sinking rapidly. The evening is a cool benediction after the burning fire of the day. Sister Benedict describes how the area once hosted seven gurgling streams which gushed through the forests bringing fertility to the soil, life for the peasant farmer and renewal to a jungle vegetation rich in plants, butterflies and animal life. Following Independence, new colonizers arrived and working through trans-national corporations, raped the forests, burnt trees and commandeered great tracks of land. Their systematic destruction of the environment robbed the village poor of their birds, beehives, deer and antilope on which they had relied for centuries. The resulting desertification had reduced the rainfall. What little water remained was diverted to the sugar estates. Yet grace and truth are to be found here. The poor Buddhist inhabitants greet me courteously and welcome Sister Benedict with love.

As darkness descends, two lads take me out into the jungle scrub to visit Chandrasare, a friend of theirs who, having fallen out with his family, has built a hut for himself away from the village. The visit of a lone white Englishman is a novelty in this dangerous place. Overnight hospitality is offered by Chandrasare. Although I feel uneasy I cannot refuse.

 

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 LAST MONTH'S REFLECTION by Tom 

                    Summary of my book

CONCLUSION from Singing the Lord's Song in a Strange Land

Our future does not depend on upgrading premises, tinkering with structures, devising new strategies either local or connexional. We will have a future when prayer rather than projects saturate our agenda. We will have a future when presbyters drag themselves away from their computers and get out and talk to people, helping them to pray, discover God in the world and talk about it. We will have a future when Methodists, who long to love God with all their heart, mind and soul, feel the encouragement of each other and know the transforming power of the Spirit. This is not rocket science. Charles, in his sermon, links his ‘wake up’ call with a demand for repentance and return.

 His judgements are abroad in the earth; and we have reason to expect the heaviest of all even that He should come unto us quickly, and remove our candlestick out of its place, except we repent and do the first works, unless we return to the principles of the Reformation, the truth and simplicity of the gospel.

 

 

 
  Boards and President